You have used a camera your whole life but now you want to make a clear distinction between picture taking and art. You want to know what it takes to produce quality images. The advice in this article will give you all you need to know to take your photography to the next level.

Use a tripod for maximum camera stability. For random shots of your kids or buildings, a bit of camera shake isn’t a big deal, but for once-in-a-lifetime shots that really matter, a bit of camera shake can ruin a perfect memory. If a tripod is not available, try setting the camera on a flat surface.

Learn how to play with the shutter speed. You can choose to snap a quick picture or choose a slower exposure to capture a flow or movement in its entirety. You will need to experiment with this and find what kind of speed matches certain situations. This is a matter of personal style rather than a general guideline to follow.

Make sure you hold the camera correctly. Holding the camera correctly reduces the chance that an inopportune movement ruins your shot. Hold the camera with your arms close to your body and the palm of your hand under the camera to prevent the camera from falling or shaking.

Keep your pictures relatively simple. A good image should be straightforward and easy to interpret and appreciate. It is important to take meaningful pictures, but in most cases your pictures will say more if you focus on a detail rather than put together a complex composition that might not strike people as much.

One of the best ways for you to learn about photography is to study examples of how to hold your camera and work your subject during photo shoots. In addition, you can talk to someone who has been in photography for a long time to gain valuable insight on your craft.

Use a rather low ISO. A good ISO is around 200. Using this range of ISO will make your pictures look dark in certain situations, but you can easily change the contrast and light on a computer. If you use a higher ISO, you will get a lot of noise on your picture, which makes editing harder.

Pay attention to your background. Your main focus should be on your object, but you should use the background to support it. Avoid any unnecessary distractions and clean your background to report the attention on your object. Play with lines and perspective in your background to compliment the shape of your object.

Learn how to use aperture on your camera. It indicates how much of the stuff that is seen in your view finder will be in focus. Low aperture means that only the foreground will be in focus and the background will be more blurred. High aperture means that everything will equally be in focus.

When traveling, take pictures of your food. Take the time to play with lights, colors and compose your pictures. You might get used to the food by the time you come back home, but these pictures will look very original to you and your friends later when you reflect back on your trip.

Leave yourself some “Lead Room” or “Active Space” when dealing with subjects that move in your shots. This is just basically some empty space either in front of the subject or behind the subject. This makes for a less-cluttered and more pleasing action shot for the viewer to look at.

Take candid shots. Instead of taking posed pictures, try taking pictures of your subject with family at work or doing something they love. When your subject is comfortable they will be more at ease and you will end up getting some unique shots. This works especially well when trying to photograph children.

Move in closer to your subject. When you spot something you’d like to take a picture of, snap a shot. Then move in closer and take a better shot. If you have your subject fill the frame, it will help the viewer appreciate and understand your photo. When taking the picture, continue to move closer until you are sure your picture will represent the subject.

If possible, avoid using the flash that you find on most cameras nowadays. It tends to give the subject ‘red eye’, and it removes a lot of the shadow that can create depth in a picture. If you have to use a flash, such as an indoor nighttime shot, keep your subject away from walls. This way you won’t end up with an ugly black shadow that resembles an outline.

The most important thing to remember about lighting when taking photographs is this: the less light you have to create from artificial resources, the better. By all means, use a flash if you need to, but always strive to use natural light if at all possible. Even when shooting indoors, open the windows, and let mother nature’s light stream in.

If you have to use your flash, then keep your subject away from walls, especially those that are light colored. Having a busy background or one that is dark will minimize the dark or harsh shadow that comes with using a flash. The best option though is to have enough light that you don’t need a flash.

Keep your background as simple as possible. By having a simple background, it will help to enhance your subject in the photograph. Busy backgrounds will distract the viewer’s attention. You can also blur the background with a wide aperture to focus on your subject only. Either one of these techniques will help your subject to stand out in the picture.

When all is said and done, anybody can take a picture but it takes a true artist to have their photography considered art. You should find that the many helpful hints in this article will help to get you on the right path if that is indeed your goal.

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